three pairs of lovers with space

GLOSSARY

 

Here follows a list of words relevant to discussion of Greek love that will be encountered on this website and are either rare or merit discussion of their precise meaning.

 

active, a.  In a Greek love context, to be the performing player, typically the man, in sexual intercourse, though, as an exception, in modern usage the irrumator in oral sex is sometimes considered the active partner.

androphile, a.  Sexually attracted to men. Generally used only of men and roughly equivalent to the modern colloquial gay. Hence ~ic, a. [Derived from the Greek νδρος andros, a man, + ϕιλία (philia), love in the sense of generally warm feelings.]

bardassa, Italian n.  A boy prostitute.  Not transvestite, but nevertheless, due to boy prostitution being better known in early modern Italy than elsewhere in Europe, derivatives of this word, bardaje and berdache, were used by the Spanish and French respectively  to describe the transvestites they encountered in the New World.

boy-love, n.  The romantic or sexual love of boys.

boy-lover, n.  A person who falls in love with boys. [In use since at least 1735.]

boysexual, n. & a. 1. A man who sexually prefers boys.  2. Sexually attracted to boys. [Coined by the writer Casimir Dukahz in his Asbestos Diary (1966) to denote the pederastic equivalent of other –sexual words. He had an extraordinary talent for wordplay and boysexual is more versatile than “pederast” and “pederastic”, its nearest equivalents.]

bugger, v.t. & n.  1. To perform an act of buggery, qv. 2. One who performs acts of buggery, qv.

buggery, n.  The Christian sin of pedicating a person or copulating with an animal, made a statutory crime in England in 1533. [Derived from the French bougre, from the mediaeval Latin Bulgarus, an 11th-century heretic from Bulgaria, supposed capable of any crime.]

bum, v.t.  To pedicate.  Derived from ~, n., meaning the buttocks, through which pedication takes place.

catamite, n. A boy kept by a man for sex. The term is considered pejorative because the implication is that the boy is in a state of dependency, such as being the man’s servant, and the man, having no reciprocal obligation to the boy beyond the need to maintain him, may be using him purely for sex.  [In use since at least 1601 and derived from the Latin catamitus (the colloquial form of concubinus, a Roman male concubine), itself derived from the Greek Γανυμήδης (Ganymedes), the name of the boy loved and kept as his cup-bearer by Zeus, the King of the Gods.]

cinaidus, Latin n. A man who is a sexual invert or, more specifically, takes the passive role in pedication.  [Derived from the Greek κίναιδος (kinaidos).]

dry, a. In the context of a boy’s orgasm, one in which he has not reached the pubertal stage of being able to ejaculate. Derived from the general sense of dry as meaning without liquid.

ephebe, n. A youth in his mid to late teens.  Derived from the Greek ἔϕηβος (ephebos), a fully-grown, but still unbearded youth, in Athenian law aged more specifically 18 or 19.

ephebophile, n. A person sexually most attracted to older adolescents aged about 15 to 19, cf. ephebophilia.

ephebophilia, n.  Sexual attraction to older adolescents aged about 15 to 19. Used mostly in psychiatric literature. [Late 19th century.  Derived from ephebe, qv. + the Greek ϕιλία (philia), love in the sense of generally warm feelings.]

erastes, ραστής, Greek n.  A man or older boy who loves a boy. The love is implicitly inspired by eros (sexual love), but could remain chaste.

eromenos, ρώμενος, Greek n. A boy loved by a man or older boy.  The love is implicitly inspired by eros (sexual love), but could remain chaste.

exoletus, Latin n.  A male prostitute or catamite who, whether still adolescent or fully mature, had passed his prime.

fellate, v.t.  To perform the act of fellatio, qv.  [In English use since the late 19th century and derived from the Latin fellāt-, the past participial stem of fellāre.]

fellatio, n.  Oral stimulation of the male sexual organ, typically to orgasm. [Taken straight from the Latin word in the late 19th century.]

fellator, n. A person who performs fellatio. [Taken straight from the Latin in the late 19th century.]

frig, v.t.  To wank or masturbate. [The oldest known English word for this, traceable back to 1598 and derived from the Old English word meaning to move briskly.]

fuck, v.t. & n. 1. In the context of Greek love, to pedicate. 2. The act of ~ing. [Its first known use in the Greek love sense was in 1809.]

fundament, n.  The buttocks or the orifice between them. [Most commonly used in the 14th-19th centuries. Derived from the Old French fondement, from the Latin fundamentum, a foundation.]

Ganymede, n.  A boy, typically beautiful, who is erotically adored by a man. In known English use since the 16th century and derived from the Greek Γανυμήδης (Ganymedes), the name of the boy loved and kept as his cup-bearer by Zeus, the King of the Gods.

Greek love, n.  The love between a boy, typically adolescent, and a man or older boy: though sexually-inspired, it could be chaste and was typically romantic.  [Derived from being a form of love particularly admired and commonly practised by the ancient Greeks.]

hebephile, n.  A person sexually most attracted to those in Tanner stages 2-3 of pubescence, cf. hebephilia.

hebephilia, n.  Sexual attraction to those in Tanner stages 2-3 of pubescence, typically now meaning aged 11-14, but formerly a little older.  Used mostly in psychiatric literature. [In use by the 1950s. Derived from the Greek βη (Hebe), the goddess of youth, + ϕιλία (philia), love in the sense of generally warm feelings.]

intercrural, a.  Between the thighs; in its usual Greek love context of ~ intercourse, sex in which the man thrusts his cock between the boy’s thighs.

irrumate, v.t.  To insert the male sexual organ in a person’s mouth. [Derived from the Latin irrumare.]

irrumation, n. The insertion of the male sexual organ in a person’s mouth. [Derived from the Latin irrumatio.]

irrumator, n. A male who inserts his cock in a person’s mouth. [Taken straight from the Latin in the late 19th century.]

kinaidos, κίναιδος Greek n. A man who is a sexual invert, or more specifically, takes the passive role in pedication.

liwāt, لواط, Arabic n. The sin of pedicating males, which, according to the Moslem interpretation of Genesis 19, caused Allāh‎ to destroy the ancient city of Sodom. [A shortening of the Arabic expression of "the act of the people of Lot", who was an inhabitant of Sodom.]

nenja, 念者, Japanese n.  The adult male lover of a wakashu, qv.

paed-, n. For all English words beginning thus, see the equivalents beginning ped-. These words derive from the Greek παιδ- (paid-), to which the stem paed- is a step closer than ped-, and were more commonly used until the 20th century..

paid-, n.  For all English words beginning thus, see the equivalents beginning ped-. These words derive from the Greek παιδ- (paid-), so the paid- stem has sometimes been preferred by scholars as an exact transliteration.

paidika, παιδικ, Greek n.  The boy in a Greek love affair.  Unlike the eromenos, there is some implication that the affair has been sexually realised, and a catamite might be referred to as one.

passive, a.  In a Greek love context, to be the receiving player, typically the boy, in sexual intercourse, though, as an exception, in modern usage the fellator in oral sex is sometimes considered the passive partner.

pederast, n.  A man who sexually prefers boys, typically adolescent. Hence ~ic, a. [In English use since the 17th century and derived from the Greek παιδεραστής (paiderastes), composed of πας, παιδος (pais, paidos), a boy, + ραστής (erastes), a lover in the sexual sense.]

pederasty, n.  Sex between men and boys, typically adolescent, or men's interest in such sex.  [In English use since the 17th century and derived from the Greek παιδεραστία (paiderastia), composed of πας, παιδος (pais, paidos), a boy, + εραστία (erastia), sexually-inspired love.]

pedicate, v.t. To penetrate a person's fundament with the male sexual organ.  A term preferred here to the clumsy and clinical, modern “have anal intercourse with” and, in most contexts, to the coarse and less precise, vernacular “fuck”.  [In English use since at least 1623 and derived from the Latin pedicare, thought to be derived from the Greek paidika, qv., boys having being those most commonly pedicated.]

pedication, n. The act of pedicating. [In English use since 1887 and derived through the French pedication from the Latin pedication.]

pedicator, n. A man who pedicates someone.  [Taken straight from the Latin by 1661.]

pedophile, n.  A person who sexually prefers pre-pubescent children; in vulgar usage, a person sexually interested in anyone younger than the prevailing laws or social conventions allow; cf. pedophilia.

pedophilia, n.  Sexual attraction to pre-pubescent children, typically now meaning aged under 11, but formerly a little older. Hence ~ic, a. [Coined in 1896, but almost unheard-of outside psychiatric literature until the early 1970s the definition is in contradiction to the word’s derivation from the rare Greek word παιδόϕιλος (paidophilos), a lover of boys who, as a matter of known practise, were always at least 12.  While it is true that the pais element of this word could mean a girl in some contexts, it never did in this combination, and in any case there is no trace of the idea of sexual attraction to girls as distinct from women in Greek literature].

peg-house, n.  A house of prostitution specialising in boys.  [Derived from the pegs used to prepare them for pedication.]

shudō, 衆道, Japanese n.  An abbreviation of wakashudō, qv. 

sodomise, v.t. To perform sodomy, qv.

sodomite, n.  One who performs an act of sodomy, qv.

sodomy, n.  The male-homosexual, biblical crime which, according to the Christian interpretation of Genesis 19, caused God to destroy the ancient city of Sodom. By the 18th century, in English law this had come to be interpreted narrowly as pedication involving emission (without which it was merely attempted ~), but in earlier times and in its equivalent use in other European languages, it was sometimes more broadly defined, including, for example, oral sex.

Tanner stage, n.  A stage of sexual development during puberty. [Derived from James Tanner, the British paediatrician who in 1948 first described five such stages.]

Uranian, n. & a.  A male homosexual in a perceived Greek tradition. Mostly used of and by pederastic writers between 1889 and 1930.  [Derived, like the slightly older German word Urning, from the Greek association of pederasty with the goddess Aphrodite sprung from Ορανός (Ouranos), the heavens.]

wakashu若衆, Japanese n.  A boy aged between 11 or 12 and 18 or 19, and recognisable as such from hair-shaving ceremonies performed at those ages, only boys of this age range being eligible to have adult lovers in pre-modern Japan.

wakashudō, 若衆道, Japanese n.  Literally “the way of loving boys” and meaning Greek love as widely practised with a strong ethical structure in pre-modern Japan.

wank, v. & n. 1. To stimulate manually the male sexual organ, typically to orgasm. 2. The act of so doing.  [The Oxford English Dictionary knows of no trace of it before 1948, though M. Davidson records hearing it in 1937 in his Some Boys and says it had a long history among the working-classes]

yard, n.  The male sexual organ.  [The most common English word for it in the 14th to 19th centuries.  Derived from the mediaeval meaning of yard as a stick.]